A taste of the seasons in the Turks and Caicos

12th December 2018 11:51 am

Any smart traveller (like yourself) knows that the weather can make or break a holiday experience. Spending dreary days stuck in a hotel room, or being unable to participate in exciting activities you booked yourself, is a recipe for frustration. Fortunately, the Big Blue Collective is here with everything you need to know about the weather in the Turks and Caicos, year round!

Weather in the Turks and Caicos: Forecast is Fantastic!

First things first, let’s take a look at the overall annual weather. While people talk of the off-peak and peak seasons in the TCI, and indeed the traditional winter, fall, spring and summer seasons as well as wider ‘hot’ and ‘cool’ seasons, it’s important to realise there’s very little overall fluctuation in the Turks and Caicos weather.  It’s consistent, pleasant and welcoming year round. The ocean is always warm, and the sun is always strong enough for you to need to take the standard beach precautions of sunscreen and a hat. Outside temperatures are typically between 80 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit (that’s 29-32 degrees Celsius), creeping a little higher at the end of summer. The water will typically be between 82-84 degrees Fahrenheit in summer, and 74-78 degrees Fahrenheit in winter. That’s 28-29 degrees Celsius and 23-26 degrees Celsius respectively. As you can see, the difference is remarkably tiny!

Almost year-round, we have the welcome cooling breezes of the east-south-east trade wind to keep the air fresh and balmy. Wind speeds can reach 12-18 miles an hour (19-29 kph) but are often very welcome. Not only do they keep the atmosphere fresher and cooler then it may otherwise be, this steady, predictable wind make the TCI one of the very best places in the world to enjoy sports like kitesurfing. Pair it with the sheltered bays and generally calm waters, and you have a winning combination for watersports of all kinds. Very occasionally a storm will shift the wind direction, but our steady old friend will soon be back.

While there are some subtle seasonal differences that the expert eye will read in the Turks and Caicos climate, the net result is an island chain that is wonderfully welcoming all year round. After all, we can claim 350 days of sunshine a year, and that’s pretty impressive!

What can I expect from fall and winter?

While some of you sun gods and goddesses may not agree, the rather warm temperatures of the islands year-round make the fall and winter seasons the ‘peak’ seasons for visitors rather than the summer. Strictly speaking, this is the ‘cool’ season and runs from November to April. At this time of year, you can flee the cold, snow-covered lands of home, and instead soak in the sun, fun and surf in the gorgeous TCI. While the cooler season is only a few degrees cooler than summer, it’s a difference that stands out, and you’ll feel more up to exciting water sports, exploring the back islands on eco-tours, drinking in the ambience of the many fascinating historical sites, and more able to enjoy walks and cycling trips with the slight reduction in heat.

If you’re visiting in the cool season, it’s highly unlikely you will experience any rainfall. You may get a quick, surprising shower if you visit in late April, but the chances are very low.

What can I expect from spring and summer?

You may be used to thinking of spring and summer as prime holiday months (and don’t get us wrong, they’re still great), but here in the TCI they’re classed as the off-peak season. They’re a touch less predictable then winter (but only just), and the temperatures will climb a little higher too. Plus, of course, it’s likely the most beautiful season for you back home too! We see the bulk of our visitors in the TCI cool season. The hot season, however, still has its charms for the visitor, and you can score many delightful discounts if you travel during this time too.

May to October are the official “hot” season months, with your highest chances of rain occurring in April through July. These showers are typically short, however, and certainly not common. As an island chain, it’s common for the Turks and Caicos to get most of its scanty annual rainfall in just one or two downpours during the hurricane season instead. When showers do occur, they are often most welcome as they refresh the air, and typically are over within an hour or two, so don’t pack up and head back to the hotel automatically if you encounter one.

What about the ‘hurricane season’?

The official hurricane season in the TCI runs between June and November. This may seem a terrifying idea, but don’t worry too much- we actually don’t see too much hurricane activity, unlike some other Caribbean islands. This is when we receive most of our rain, however, in one, sometimes two torrential downpours. Very occasionally roads will flood, but the sun soon dries out the excess water and business goes back to normal. Hurricane Irma is the only serious hurricane to have passed through our waters in a decade, and the number of hurricane warnings that result in landfall the Big Blue Collective have seen can be counted on one hand. If you are very concerned, however, the bulk of ‘major’ hurricane activity for the TCI has been seen in the end-August to early September period.

Do remember, however, that while we are relatively quiet and sheltered and those already on the island will still be able to enjoy themselves, your flights may be impacted by other hurricane activity or warnings in the Caribbean at this time of year. We are very lucky to have excellent predictive services working in the area keeping everyone safe, but it will occasionally lead to flights being rescheduled for hurricanes which do not actually materialise or make landfall. Try to plan flexible holiday dates and opt for airlines with a good track record of helping you reschedule your trip if travelling at this time of year.

As you can see, the weather in the Turks and Caicos is great all year round, so why not let the Big Blue Collective help you make the holiday of a lifetime in the TCI come true today?


Filed under: Weather

What’s the TCI’s weather like in May?

17th October 2018 10:48 am

While the Turks and Caicos weather is pretty clement for most of the year, it’s always good to know exactly what you can expect from your time on the island. Fortunately, the TCI weather in May is among the best you will experience, and occupies the perfect sweet spot for your travels. Today, the Big Blue Collective take a closer look.

What season is it in May?

The TCI’s weather in May is the first of the so-called ‘hot’ months-don’t worry, though, it’s never actually cold! November to April is traditionally viewed as the ‘cool’ season, but the annual variance is only something like 10° F. Oddly, however, the difference is quite noticeable, possibly due to the close proximity of so much warm water to amplify the heat. This makes May one of the most perfect months in which to travel, where you still get a crisp breeze or two but all the fun of the warm season and the opportunity to explore the island with fewer crowds hemming you in. It’s also one of the very best if you’re an avid on-land outdoorsman. Cycling, hiking or having fun exploring the rich historical heritage of the island are all perfect at this time of year, before it heats up too much. The water sports, as always, remain excellent year round, and the Turks and Caicos in May favours adventure.

What can I expect from the TCI weather in May?

If you’re visiting the TCI in May, you’re just past the cusp of what’s defined as the ‘high season’. This means you’ve beaten the tourist rush, without losing out on any of the glorious Grace Bay weather that makes it one of the best beaches in the world. In fact, temperatures will be climbing a little if you love to bask. There is a small possibility of some rain in May, but don’t worry- it will be an intermittent shower which will pass soon enough. Typically, these occur around 8pm at night, so you’ll likely be lying back with cocktails and enjoying the cooling effect rather than suffering any real inconvenience The lower rainfall in this month means mosquitoes won’t yet be an irritant, so that’s another plus. The last dregs of the trade winds tend to chase away any winged pests who may be encouraged by the hotter weather.

May is the last month before hurricane season officially hits the TCI.  It’s very rare for a strong hurricane to hit the islands, however, for all the recent passing through of Hurricane Irma, and the ‘worst’ of the weather comes much later in the year. Still, if you’re keen to avoid any interruption to your holiday by inclement weather then May is the month for you. There’s even better news! Despite the common perception that it’s better to come in winter for the many exciting wind-and-wave sports on offer, conditions are actually pretty great year-round. If kiteboarding and windsurfing are your thing you’ll be able to have fabulous fun on the water, so come ready to play whatever your definition of fun!

What can I do in the TCI in May?

It’s too late in the year to spot whales at play, but nothing else the TCI has to offer will be off-limits to you, and the Grace Bay weather is perfect for lounging in the sun and playing in the waves. Now is the also the ideal time for travellers with a tight budget to enjoy the islands with a little extra room in your pocketbook, too. As always you should make sure you bring your sunblock of choice to avoid sporting a lobster-red tan, particularly at midday!

What activities can I participate in?

With the Turks and Caicos weather prompting everyone to enjoy, there can be little surprise that many festivals and activities take place throughout May. Sports fishers will find plenty to do regardless of when in this month you visit, but if you are coming late in May you could even catch the Caicos Classic Annual Release Tournament. This offshore fishing tournament allows line-fishing teams to size up each other’s catch in a friendly challenge.

If you have Mexican heritage [or just want to join the fun] Cinco de Mayo is held near Turtle Bay on the Islands, so put on your best party clothes and come celebrate with us! More unique to island culture, May is also the month for the Big South Regatta. This festival of all things nautical- boat races, concerts, entertainment, food and more- has been a tradition of the islands since 1967, and if you’re looking for some local flavour nothing could be better. Dance around a maypole, enter the local beauty pageant, or just sit back and let the upbeat vibe replenish your soul.

Sports fans, it’s time to get excited too. The Women’s International Festival of Football is also held in May, featuring our local talent squaring off against an invited international team. It’s also the season for the Windvibes Kiteboarding Tournament, which will give you the perfect chances to check out the very best of the best, and even join in on a free kiteboarding beginner lesson if you’re keen. There’s prizes, raffles and plenty of tasty eats and drinks to enjoy.

What should I know about Grace Bay’s weather?

Many visitors to the TCI call Grace Bay the best beach in the world, and it certainly makes Top 10 lists enough to earn the title. Powder soft white sand and achingly clear water will great you, clear of debris and flotsam, calling to you to lie down and enjoy the sun. A gorgeous coral reef lies just offshore, yet even in the peak season the crowds are not unbearable. Glamorous quality accommodation rings the entire area for your comfort, and access points are plentiful. In short, it’s perfection.

It’s difficult to imagine that this area is also part of the protected Princess Alexandra Land and Sea National Park, sheltering a huge diversity of marine life, birds and wildlife, but it is. The entire area is tranquil, sheltered and perfect for relaxation and play alike. The stunning Grace Bay weather contributes hugely to this. Expect the beach to be rather hot in May- the Turks and Caicos weather doesn’t mess around! Later in the summer it may be too hot by noon for even the most sun-loving sunbather, but you’ll still be able to get in a good long basking session for the moment. Weather conditions for kiteboarding, stand up paddle boarding and windsurfing are clement too.

The Turks and Caicos weather is great no matter the time of year, but the TCI’s weather in May is something special all of its own. With Grace Bay’s gorgeous weather calling you to relax, and all the fun of the many festivities island-wide, May is the perfect time to party in the Turks and Caicos. Come meet the Big Blue Unlimited team today, and make your island dreams a reality.

oday, and make your island dreams a reality.


Filed under: Weather

What’s the weather like in the TCI in April?

13th September 2018 10:32 am

While the Turks and Caicos has generally amazing weather all year round, it’s always worth knowing exactly what to expect from your trip. April is one of our favourite months here at Big Blue Collective, and brings you some amazing opportunities for fun in the sun, so keep reading to plan the trip of a lifetime and learn a little more about the TCI’s weather in April!

What can I expect from the TCI weather in April?

April is the very tail end of the ‘high’ season in the Turks and Caicos, so it’s may well be the very best month of them all to visit. Of course, sun and sunshine aren’t that much of a concern in the TCI- we do get about 350 days of solid, gorgeous sunshine a year, so you’re bound to have fun whenever you come! April sits just before the possibility of rain, however, and that’s always the one thing that could dampen your experience.

The best news of all is that the water temperature will be very consistent at this time of year, which makes it superlative for all sorts of water sports. Ocean swells are slightly higher, but we bet you won’t even notice. While conditions for more wind-orientated sports are always a little more consistent in winter, the difference is fairly minimal no matter when you come, so if you’re keen to head out windsurfing or kiteboarding you’ll be able to enjoy your sport without worries.

You may have heard that mosquitoes may be a worry on the TCI, but this is more relevant to the wetter months, so don’t worry too much. There is still some trade wind activity in the TCI in April, so that tends to keep all manner of potential flying pests away- you’ll be free to enjoy your holiday in peace.

What is the tourism like in April in the TCI?

The TCI’s weather in April makes this month a ‘sweet spot’ for tourists. You may just be able to take advantage of the lower prices of off-season [although it’s still counted as high season in many places], but still experience all the beauty of perfect weather. The crowds will have lessened considerably, although you will still see plenty of friendly faces around for another few months. It is too late in the year for whale watching, although you will still be able to meet dolphins and stingrays up close and personal. Otherwise, you should have the best of all worlds, with all of the fantastic adventure sports that are synonymous with the Turks and Caicos open to you. April to May is the perfect travel time for budget travellers who still want to experience the vibe of the island as it bustles, but prefer it to be a little easier on the pocket too. While a few very rare rain showers may make an appearance, it’s highly unlikely, and the beaches should be the perfect level of populated.

If an action-packed holiday just isn’t for you, there is still great sunny weather for you to enjoy on the beaches. Be sure to include a good sunblock in your bag, because the island sun is perfect for a little safe tanning. The Annual Kite Flying Competition typically takes place in April, so be sure to take a swing past Bight Beach and check out the brightly-coloured fun! The Turks and Caicos April weather is also perfect for sport fishing, and all of the local sports fish are available for you to catch.

What cuisine is open to me in April?

You’ve just missed the lobster season here in the TCI, but don’t let that stop you from exploring the delectable seafood offerings open to you. The Nassau Grouper is a staple of almost every island dish- and delicious to boot. You’re also able to explore the conch and all of the related products the island produces. This simple shell is of deep importance on the islands, and you’ll have the perfect chance to snatch a shell or two as a memento from the talented craftsmen on the islands too. Be sure to swing through the Conch Museum while you’re here, too.

What should I wear?

While beachwear is always the fashion of the day on the Turks and Caicos, you’ll need to throw on some other duds if you’re going to go exploring [and you totally should]. You won’t need anything too hectic, however- think a few light shirts and shorts, and maybe a light sweater in the evenings if you’re susceptible to cold. If you’d like a little extra UV protection or want to venture out snorkelling or swimming, throw in a pair of sleeve rash-guards to keep you looking spiffy. You can always pick up anything you need in the shops on Provo if you forget something, so pack light- people often find that, due to the clement TCI weather in April, they’ve over packed and don’t use half the clothes they bring.

The weather in the TCI in April can be said to be almost perfect. While you’ll miss out on the chance to spot some whales, you’ll find the perfect wind conditions for kiteboarding, beautiful beaches without the crowds, and a ton of fun just waiting for you. Why not let Big Blue Collective help you make your April TCI dreams come true and book today?


Filed under: Weather

Turks and Caicos Weather in March

28th August 2018 12:28 pm

Want to know what to pack for your trip to the TCI? The great news is that the Turks and Caicos Islands are a pleasant travel destination no matter what time of year you choose to visit. However, March is a great choice for the average visitor, as it’s still part of the dry season and rainfall should be a minimum. On the plus side for our North American and Canadian visitors, too, it’s the perfect destination to escape the gloomy clutches of your own weather this time of year! That does mean the islands are a little busier than average at this time, however. Don’t let that frighten you- the TCI is still one of few places in the Caribbean where you stand a reasonable chance of having a beach to yourself!

TCI Weather patterns for March

Of course, as the TCI are islands, there’s nothing like fully predictable weather. The exposed nature of an island leaves it somewhat at Mother Nature’s mercy- but she’s generally pretty kind to the Turks and Caicos. Daytime temperatures usually hover around 82°F [27-28°C] pretty consistently, rarely falling below 74°F [23°C].

There’s unlikely to be any rain, or hurricane threat, at this time of year. This is still the dry season.

The Turks and Caicos tourist in March

As we mentioned above, this is part of the peak travel season for the TCI, so expect to find more visitors here than average. It’s possible you may encounter in-season pricing, but that can be offset against the fact that all tour operators are facing heavy competition- thus a great incentive to do their best.

Pests

The only pest-bugs to consider too much in the TCI are the mozzies, and they only tend to rear their heads when it is rainy season, so you’re in the clear for now. As the March trade winds will be in full swing, you’ll find that most flying insects avoid the area- and you- as they can’t fly properly.

Sunburn

Don’t let the fact it’s ‘winter’ here stop you from bringing your sunblock! UVA and UVB exposure is pretty consistent throughout the year, and we strongly advise using a reef-safe, high factor sunscreen during your travels here no matter what time of year you intend to arrive.

TCI activities perfect for March weather

While the Turks and Caicos are perfect for fun in the sun year-round, March is a particularly nice month for the water babies among you. Ocean temperature rarely lags behind ambient temperature by more than a degree or two, so the crystal clear waters will be warm and inviting. Think of your bathtub at the perfect refreshing temperature, and you’re in the right ballpark. If only winter was as clement everywhere in the world!

 

As always, snorkelling and diving can be done here year-round, as well as kayaking, stand up paddleboarding and any charter boat exploration you want to undertake. It’s a great time to add kiteboarding to your skill list too, as the winter winds tend to be more predictable [and need less of an experienced hand] than those in summer.

Whale Watching

March represents the very last tail end of the whale watching season, and you’ll likely only spot these magnificent beasts at play in the very early part of the month [February is a better choice for definite whale sightings]. As the stragglers will be in a hurry to reach their final destination, you will be better off heading out on a whale-watching expedition rather than hoping to spot them from the beach. Dive and snorkel enthusiasts, do remember that we will, if a suitable opportunity presents itself, attempt to interact with these giants of the water- so the experience of a lifetime could be waiting for you.

Kayaking and paddleboarding

It’s always perfect weather for kayaking in the TCI, and March is no exception. This unique way to explore the islands allows you to get up-close-and-personal with her varied marine animals and birdlife, nosing among the mangrove channels that give this area her characteristic flat, calm water and protect the diversity of animals in the area. If you’re interested in eco-friendly, non-intrusive travel, then this is the sport for you.

Big Blue Collective offer unparalleled stand up paddle boarding instruction, and now is a great time of year to try your hand at this simple and accessible water sport. The water in our home bay is typically very calm at this time of year, with the natural reefs that surround Provo providing the perfect windbreak even if the weather acts up a little on the sea. If you’re looking for a little active relaxation, there couldn’t be a better sport for you. We offer a full range of paddleboarding eco-tours for you to indulge in if you’re a little more confident, too- meet the bird life of the island, skim over the flat clear water as tropical fish flash below you, and so much more.

Plan ahead

The Turks and Caicos are a very popular destination at this time of year, as they make the perfect spot to soak in some rays and boost your mood before the Northern winter sets in at home. Add to that the last lure of whale watching and you’ll understand why this is one of the busiest times of year for local service providers. Whether you’re checking into a hotel, resort or renting your own private villa, be sure to get your bookings handled early so you aren’t disappointed. Book flights early, too, as the local airports don’t handle particularly high volumes of international flights weekly- you want to make sure you’re on the right flight, after all! You may find that in-season peak booking charges do apply at this time of year, so a little early booking might also be the best way to get a little discount on the cost, too. Fortunately, pressure and popularity is slightly relieved after the spate of US public and school holidays in February, so it will likely be a little easier to book and find rooms.

 

Adventure is always just a click away with Big Blue Collective, so now you know what the TCI weather in March is like, isn’t it time to get planning your next great eco-adventure with us?


Filed under: Weather

What Are the Climate Change Impacts on the Turks and Caicos Islands?

27th February 2018 9:58 am

The Turks and Caicos is an archipelago nation in the Caribbean and is especially susceptible to climate change and all that comes with it. This was especially noticeable in 2017, when Hurricane Irma—the first hurricane to make landfall on the TCIs in decades—devastated the Turks and Caicos and was quickly followed by Hurricanes Maria and Katia (when it was a tropical depression), both of which came uncomfortably close.

While category 5 hurricanes are attention-grabbing events, there are actually several more gradual or less obvious ways climate change is impacting the Turks and Caicos and your future trip to this Caribbean paradise.

Higher Sea Levels

Two main mechanisms contribute to observed sea level rise:

  1. Thermal expansion: Many things expand when warmed, and ocean water is no different. As the ocean heat content increases, sea level rises.
  2. Melting of major stores of land ice like ice sheets and glaciers: Ice melt flows off of mountains and land and into the ocean, adding to the ocean volume.

Based on a study published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 68% of recent sea level rise between 1993–2008 has been attributed by melting ice, and roughly one third has come from thermal expansion

Partial deglaciation of the Greenland ice sheet, and possibly the West Antarctic ice sheet, could contribute 4 to 6 m (13 to 20 ft) or more to sea level rise.

What Does Higher Sea Levels Mean for TCI?

Beaches are shrinking—and not just because the sea level is inching higher. Beaches are already shrinking due to beach erosion, which is a naturally occurring event as the lapping of the waves disrupt the coastline and pull sand deeper into the water. With the added rise of sea levels, more of the Turks and Caicos beaches are exposed to water movement.

Man-made techniques such as beach nourishment—whereby sand is dredged from off-shore sources and deposited along otherwise vanishing beaches—may slow the process, but nothing short of global cooling or some other major geomorphic change will stop beach erosion. If this does happen, you can expect the overall costs of visiting the Turks and Caicos to go up.

Warmer Waters

The ocean heat content is increasing. Unfortunately, warmer water is precisely what births the humongous and ferocious hurricanes that we are seeing with increasing frequency each year. In the Northern Atlantic Ocean, hurricane season is defined from June 1 to November 30, sharply peaking from late August through September.

Warmer water in the region means hurricanes can form sooner, with more frequency, and with greater intensity.

What Does Warmer Waters Mean for TCI?

Hurricanes

Your first thought is that jumping into warmer waters if great! Unfortunately, you might not get the chance if poor weather disrupts your travel plans. Travellers were stranded all across the Caribbean islands after a hurricane swept through. Scores of flights were cancelled and delayed and cruise boats were diverted.

When the vast majority of Caribbean trips are planned and booked months in advance, hurricanes are a huge unknown. Hurricane season has several months that coincides with vacation season and a trip that you’ve been looking forward to can be easily disrupted.

In September 2017, the United States National Hurricane Center reported that the North Atlantic basin was highly active because four tropical storms formed and they all became hurricanes. They report a higher than average record on the number of tropical storms that developed into hurricanes this year. Two of these four hurricanes, Irma and Maria, hit the islands in the Caribbean.

Once at the Caribbean, both Irma and Maria became Category 5 hurricanes. NASA reported that the temperature of the sea surface in the Caribbean when Irma became a hurricane was 30 °C (86 °F). The required temperature for the development of a major storm is suggested to be higher than 27 °C (80 °F).

Coral bleaching

A defined hurricane season doesn’t mean the Turks and Caicos are off limits, so you’ll still be able to make it to the islands where you can enjoy spectacular diving and snorkeling—in places where coral still survive.

Coral bleaching occurs when coral polyps expel algae that normally live inside their tissues. As the algae provide the coral with up to 90% of its energy, coral will starve after expelling the algae. Above-average sea water temperatures caused by global warming have been identified as a leading cause for coral bleaching worldwide.

In a 2005 study, a rise in the sea surface temperature is thought to have caused widespread coral bleaching in the Caribbean. In this study, researchers evaluate if this increase in sea surface temperature was due to natural climate variability or human activity. They concluded that it would be very unlikely that natural climate variability alone could account for this event.

Climate Change Impact on Turks and Caicos

The climate change impact on the Turks and Caicos will be severe. On September 8, Minister of Infrastructure Goldray Ewing confirmed that damage to Providenciales was extensive, with the northwestern neighborhood of Blue Hill being “gone”. The hospital in the capital, Cockburn Town, was damaged. On South Caicos, 75% of roofs were lost. Total damage is still being evaluated, but believed to exceed the $231 million toll of Hurricane Ike in 2008.

According to socio-economic experts, vanishing reefs can spark hunger, poverty and political instability to regions dependent on revenue generated from their coasts. Since countless sea life depend on the reefs for shelter and protection from predators, the extinction of the reefs would ultimately create a domino effect that would trickle down to the many human societies that depend on those fish for food, tourism, and livelihood.

The coral reefs along the Turks and Caicos’ coasts draw scuba divers, snorkelers and other tourists to seaside resorts and help maintain some of the world’s finest sandy beaches by absorbing energy from waves. Without the reefs, hotels, restaurants and other businesses that cater to tourists could suffer financially.

Many Caribbean countries, including nearby Turks and Caicos, get nearly half their gross national product from visitors seeking tropical underwater experiences.

What Can You Do to Help?

In the foreseeable future, the Turks and Caicos will continue to be a popular destination despite the ongoing changes brought on by climate change, and there are plenty of ways to be a positive influence on the environment, including supporting organizations focused on sustainability.

At Big Blue Collective, we are committed to providing you the best adventures with the least environmental impact possible. We keep our adventure groups small to ensure minimal impact while maximizing your experiences on the reef, in the mangroves, or in the ocean.

Year after year, we find new ways to discover the Turks and Caicos and better ways to do so. Our vision is constantly being refined and redefined to ensure a sustainable approach within a viable business framework.

Contact Big Blue Collective to learn more about what eco-friendly activities you can do while you’re in the Turks and Caicos or go ahead and book your adventures today.



Turks and Caicos Weather in February

5th February 2018 8:57 am

The Turks and Caicos Islands are known as a year round travel destination because of the good Caribbean weather. In fact, the Turks and Caicos weather in February offers some of the best conditions you will ever have in the Caribbean.

February is prime dry season month in the Turks and Caicos, and it coincides with some of the gloomiest weather people in northern United States and Canada experience at this time. So if you’re interested in enjoying the Turks and Caicos weather in February, prepare to enjoy the weather with a lot of other vacationers from the northern hemisphere.

Turks and Caicos Weather in February

While localized weather patterns can’t be predicted long term with accuracy, the Turks and Caicos temperatures in February tends to average between 27°C and 29°C (or 80°F and 84°F respectively). How’s that for consistency?

February has historically been a hurricane-free month. In fact, it’s unlikely that there will be much rainfall during February since February is in the middle of the dry season.

Turks and Caicos in February

The Turks and Caicos is a year round destination, but February is peak travelling time. This means the Turks and Caicos will be at its busiest with tourism prices being at their highest. However, this also means the tourism sector will be in full swing, and you can expect every touring operation to be at their best.

Mosquitos

Mosquitos will be less of a nuisance in February than in most months. While the Turks and Caicos are in the natural habitable range of mosquitos, they only become a nuisance when there is flooding, which is unlikely in February since the TCIs see very little rain during this time.

Also, trade winds tend to pick up during February, which can greatly reduce a mosquito’s ability to fly. Tourist areas like Providenciales will practically be mosquito free.

Activities

Turks and Caicos in February is great if you love hanging out in or on the water. The ocean is frequently described to be at a comfortable, “bathtub warm” temperature with mostly calm conditions.

The ocean water is at a very comfortable 82°F, or 28°C.

While activities such as boat charters, snorkelling, diving, kayaking, and stand up paddleboarding can be enjoyed year round, kiteboarding is a particularly good choice at this time because the winds are more consistent during the winter months.

Kiteboarding

The Turks and Caicos beaches are known for their shallow lengths and calm waters. Along with the good winds during this time, February is a great month for people want to learn or improve their kiteboarding skills.

If you’re new to the sport, it’s easy to find PASA and IKO certified kiteboarding instructors with decades of experience. It won’t take you long to get a good run if you’re a beginner. Or, if you’re an advanced intermediate, you can pick up and refine the more flashy techniques.

If you’re already an avid kiteboarding fan, then you already know that the Turks and Caicos is a kiteboarder’s ultimate dream. Head over to Long Bay where you can ride for miles.

Whale Watching

Whale watching is the only activity that’s truly seasonal, as the migrating humpback whales only make their appearance from late December to early March. So if you’re on the islands in February, you have a reasonable chance of seeing them coast along the shore.

However, the best place to see them obviously isn’t on land. Book a whale watching adventure to increase your chance of seeing these majestic leviathans. If you book the right tour group and if the whales don’t mind your presence, you might even have the rare and once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to snorkel or dive with the animals!

Stand Up Paddleboarding

The waters around Turks and Caicos are warm year round and can be exceptionally calm on the shallow beaches at this time. Even if the ocean gets a bit choppy from the higher winds, the natural reefs form a shelter that protects the beaches from high surf. This makes stand up paddleboarding a great activity for families, kids, or people who want a more relaxed activity.

Some special tours using paddleboards include eco-tours you can take to see delicate ecosystems supporting nesting birds. Or, you can skim over clear waters near reefs and see vibrantly colored marine life right beneath your board.

Kayaking

Kayaking is great to explore beaches, shallow channels, tidal creeks, and around the cays. It’s a quiet and non-intrusive way to get close up pictures of wildlife like iguanas and birds.

Like paddleboarding, you can embark on kayak eco-tours that let you explore the Turks and Caicos’ natural beauty.

Book Early for Your Turks and Caicos February Vacation

February is one of Turks and Caicos’ busiest months in terms of tourism. It’s important that you book early—not only for your hotel and flights, but also for any activities you want to do.

Hotels charge their highest prices during the peak winter period, and you’ll have to make your reservations months in advance, especially around the United State’s holiday, Presidents’ Day weekend. The Easter holidays/school spring break is an increasingly popular time for families to visit.

Contact Big Blue Collective to learn more about what eco-friend activities you can do while you’re in Providenciales or go ahead and book your adventures today.


Filed under: Weather

Turks and Caicos Weather in November

13th November 2017 11:35 am

Turks and Caicos weather in November takes a turning point as the islands transition from the “hot” months to the “cool” months. While the words hot and cool are on other ends of the spectrum, the reality is that the average temperature difference is a maximum of 10°F, so it’s really that big of a change.

Turks and Caicos Weather in November

While localized weather patterns can’t be predicted long term with accuracy, the Turks and Caicos temperatures in November tends to average between 25°C and 28°C (or 84°F and 76°F respectively).

November 30 is the end of the hurricane season (that officially began June 1). While there still needs to be a willingness to accept poor weather and be flexible with your plans, the likelihood of hurricanes should be reduced. Even if hurricanes do form but don’t make landfall on the islands, nearby tropical depressions or storms can disrupt air travel and create storm surges and flooding around the coast.

Turks and Caicos in November

The Turks and Caicos is a year round destination, but November is the transition month between off-peak and peak travel time in the Caribbean. This means there can still be some lingering resort and excursion deals before prices shoot up again.

Some people actually believe November is one of the best times to visit the Turks and Caicos because the prices are decent and the crowds haven’t achieved maximum size.

Mosquitos

While the Turks and Caicos are in the natural habitable range of mosquitos, they only become a nuisance when there is flooding, usually from the tropical storms. Also, November and December is about the time when the trade winds amp up again, which can greatly reduce a mosquito’s flight.

Tourist areas like Providenciales usually see far fewer mosquitoes as these areas are well maintained and have good drainage systems.

Grand Turk and Salt Cay also have less serious mosquito problems because these islands lack dense vegetation and there aren’t many natural sites that collect rainwater or form pools. They also experience breezes that disrupt mosquito activity.

However, North and Middle Caicos, Parrot Cay, and Pine Cay, have can be mosquito spawning sites after heavy rain.

Activities

Turks and Caicos in November is great if you love hanging out in or on the water. The ocean is frequently described to be at a comfortable, “bathtub warm” temperature with calm conditions. This is a great time for visitors because the rush of tourists hasn’t fully returned yet.

The ocean water is at a very comfortable 82°F, or 28°C.

Stand Up Paddleboarding

The waters around Turks and Caicos are warm year round and can be exceptionally calm on the shallow beaches. This makes stand up paddleboarding a great activity for families, kids, or people who want a more relaxed activity.

Some special tours using paddleboards include eco-tours you can take to see delicate ecosystems supporting nesting birds. Or, you can skim over clear waters near reefs and see vibrantly colored marine life right beneath your board.

Kayaking

Kayaking is great to explore beaches, shallow channels, tidal creeks, and around the cays. It’s a quiet and non-intrusive way to get close up pictures of wildlife like iguanas and birds.

Like paddleboarding, you can embark on kayak eco-tours that let you explore the Turks and Caicos’ natural beauty.

Snorkeling and Diving

If the sea is calm enough, snorkeling and diving are great activities to do when you’re in the Turks and Caicos during November. Crowds haven’t quite picked up yet, so you still have an opportunity to enjoy the snorkel and dive sites in relative quiet.

In fact, there are snorkeling tours that will take you out to several snorkel sites. Knowledgeable guides can help you identify the hundreds of different fish and describe the important coral reef ecology.

If you’re more comfortable with deep waters, diving is an excellent November activity. You can descend and scale walls that are dozens of feet to over 100 feet that are overflowing with life.

Events

Turks and Caicos Conch Festival

Every November, the island of Providenciales hosts the Turks and Caicos Conch Festival—a celebration of the islands’ national symbol and greatest export: the conch, a marine snail that for years has played an integral role in local cuisine.


Filed under: Weather
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Which Is The Best Caribbean Island to Visit in February?

6th November 2017 11:35 am

One of the best times to visit the Caribbean islands is February. It’s a popular time to visit as it’s in the middle of peak travel times, which means there will be great weather, a vibrant energy from all the visitors, and a lot of opportunities to enjoy yourself.

But because it’s during peak travel time, prices will be a bit high and you will need extensive planning, no matter which Caribbean island you end up choosing to go to.

Providenciales, Turks and Caicos in February

Providenciales in Turks and Caicos is a strong contender as one of the best Caribbean islands you can go to during February. In terms of natural conditions, you’ll be hard pressed to find anything better than a February vacation.

TCI Weather in February

Providenciales weather in February is great. It’s one of the drier months and the temperature is at a comfortable 85°-90°F (29°-32°C). Mosquitos aren’t very common unless there’s the unlikely event of heavy rains and flooding

TCI Prices in February

Because February is just past the the middle of peak travel season (December to April), prices start coming down. However, the Turks and Caicos tourism industry is till in full swing and every business is operating at 100%.

TCI Activities in February

Kiteboarding

The average wind speed during February is actually higher than normal, which makes kiteboarding an excellent activity for a February vacation on Providenciales.

Since Turks and Caicos is such a hotspot for kiteboarding, it’s easy to find PASA and IKO certified kiteboarding instructors with decades of experience. It won’t take long for beginners to get a good run or an advanced intermediate to pick up and refine the more flashy techniques.

Stand up paddleboarding or kayaking

The day to day ocean conditions tend to be a little choppier and have higher swells during the winter months, which can take away from a stand up paddleboaring or kayaking ocean excursion.

However, Providenciales has many natural formations like bays, reefs, and mangrove channels that can shield certain areas from the more tumultuous ocean surface, so paddleboarding or kayaking can still be a fun activity.

Whale Watching

November to February are great months to spot whales in the Turks and Caicos. This season coincides with the humpback whale migration as they transit towards their northern feeding grounds. You might even catch sights of a few calves as the Caribbean is a known breeding ground.

These, of course, are chance encounters. However, February in the Caribbean is usually peak whale spotting times.

Book Your February Caribbean Trip Early

February is one of Turks and Caicos’ busiest months in terms of tourism. It’s important that you book early—not only for your hotel and flights, but also for any activities you want to do.

Contact Big Blue Collective to learn more about what eco-friend activities you can do while you’re in Providenciales or go ahead and book your adventures today.


Filed under: Weather
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Turks and Caicos Weather in October

27th September 2017 4:51 pm

While weather is constantly changing, the Turks and Caicos weather in October generally begins to improve during this time as the hurricane season begins to wind down. While it’s not uncommon for some Turks and Caicos to close their shops and go on their own holidays in September while TCI tourism is low, October is when everyone gets back revitalized and ready to entertain visitors and tourists.

Turks and Caicos Weather in October

While localized weather patterns can’t be predicted long term with accuracy, the Turks and Caicos temperatures in October tends to average between 25°C and 28°C (or 84°F and 77°F respectively).

Officially, October is still a part of the hurricane season (from June 1 to November 30), so there’s always a level of unpredictability and the need to be flexible with your plans. Even if hurricanes don’t make landfall on the islands, nearby hurricanes can disrupt air travel and create storm surges and flooding around the coast.

On a TripAdvisor forum, one frequent TCI visitor notes:

“We have gone to TCI about 15 times in late September or early October over the past 20 years, and until last year [in 2015], always had great weather with no tropical storm problems. Last year in early October, [Hurricane Joaquin] stopped almost all beach activities for five days. All other [previous] visits, we have had excellent weather: sunny, hot, light winds, pleasant nights. There may be an occasional thunderstorm, but they don’t last long and most of them are in the evening. Based on our experience, I would definitely be glad to return in October.”

You should always pay attention to and monitor weather reports regardless of when you visit. While hurricane season is nearing its end around this time, it’s still nice to be forewarned of any rain!

Turks and Caicos in October

The Turks and Caicos is a year round destination, but October is typically categorized as an off-peak travel month (with November through December considered peak travel). This means if you look carefully and don’t mind the chance of rain, you can find great Turks and Caicos resort deals.

Some people actually believe October is one of the best times to visit the Turks and Caicos because of fewer crowds and better prices.

Mosquitos

Be mindful that rainfall may temporarily increase mosquito nuisance. The Turks and Caicos are in the natural habitable range of mosquitos and there can be more mosquitos for a few weeks after particularly heavy rains.

Fortunately, tourist areas like Providenciales usually see far fewer mosquitoes as these areas are well maintained with minimal places for stagnant water to linger. Areas that are in the path of eastern trade winds also keep mosquito presence to a minimum.

Grand Turk and Salt Cay also have less serious mosquito problems because these islands lack dense vegetation and there aren’t many natural sites that collect rainwater or form pools. They also experience breezes that disrupt mosquito activity.

However, North and Middle Caicos, Parrot Cay, and Pine Cay, have many sites that are ideal mosquito spawning sites and tourists can experience severe mosquito exposure after heavy rains.

Activities on TCI

Turks and Caicos in October is great if you love hanging out in or on the water. The ocean is frequently described to be at a comfortable, “bathtub warm” temperature with calm conditions. This is a great time for visitors because there are such few travellers at this time. If you go to the Turks and Caicos in October, you’ll practically be first in line for any activity or restaurant.

Stand Up Paddleboarding

The waters around Turks and Caicos are warm year round and can be exceptionally calm on the shallow beaches. This makes stand up paddleboarding a great activity for families, kids, or people who want a more relaxed activity.

Some special tours using paddleboards include eco-tours you can take to see delicate ecosystems supporting nesting birds. Or, you can skim over clear waters near reefs and see vibrantly colored marine life right beneath your board.

Kayaking

Kayaking is great to explore beaches, shallow channels, tidal creeks, and around the cays. It’s a quiet and non-intrusive way to get close up pictures of wildlife like iguanas and birds.

Like paddleboarding, you can embark on kayak eco-tours that let you explore the Turks and Caicos’ natural beauty.

Stand up paddleboarding and kayaking can be interesting during this time as rain can raise the water level enough for you to explore areas that are typically unavailable during the rest of the year. The downside is that because of the unpredictable weather, you might have to hold off on water activities until a tropical storm or hurricane has subsided.

Snorkeling and Diving

If the sea is calm enough, snorkeling and diving are great activities to do when you’re in the Turks and Caicos during October. You won’t have to be crowded with other travelling divers or get kicked in the head while snorkeling at a busy location. You’ll have the sites to yourself!

Explore and enjoy the serenity of the natural reefs by yourself. There won’t be other people to kick up the sand or scare away the fish and you can truly see what these natural environments are like as they truly are.

In fact, there are snorkeling tours that will take you out to several snorkel sites. Knowledgeable guides can help you identify the hundreds of different fish and describe the important coral reef ecology.

If you’re more comfortable with deep waters, diving is an excellent October activity. You can descend and scale walls that are dozens of feet to over 100 feet that are overflowing with life.

Events

TCI Amateur Open

The Provo Golf & Country Club frequently hosts the annual TCI Amateur Open in November, which has been a mainstay event for the past 50 years. It’s a three-day tournament that attracts a mix of local and international golfers and spectators, with both men and women trophies awarded in various age brackets.

 


Filed under: Activities, Weather